View of the Drew | Andrew Halpern Photography

Running through the Met Life Building

Running through the Met Life Building (42nd and Park, NYC)

1/100s . f/8.0 . ISO 200 . 42 mm

Here’s a view you don’t see often: the inside of the Met Life Building.  I was able to get this view because of an NYC summer program called Summer Streets, where Park Avenue is open to only cyclists and pedestrians for 3 weekends each in the summer.  One way to get great shots like this is be on the lookout for opportunities where you can access places that are normally off-limits.

Perspective Correction

Original shot perspective distorted

Original shot: distorted perspective

Perspective is fixed, the shot looks straight on

The Vertical Lens Correction slider is one of my my favorite features in Adobe Lightroom. This sign I photographed from below because it was about 15 feet above me.

To correct perspective, I first straighten the image using the straighten tool in the Crop Overlay area (press “R” to get to it quickly). When that is done, I scroll all the way down the Develop module until I find the “Lens Corrections” panel. I then use the vertical slider until the image looks correct. It’s very quick to fix distortion this way.

Lucerne Skyline

Lucerne, Switzerland skyline

1/400s . f/10.0 . ISO 200 . 79 mm

Here is a skyline of Lucerne, Switzerland.  What I like most about this shot is the many layers all smashed together in by my telephoto lens.

It’s important to close-down the aperture for such a shot in order to maintain sharpness throughout the whole image.  As you can probably tell, in order to get the shading exactly right, this shot had to be highly post-processed.  The nice thing is that I was able to do the entire thing within Lightroom using the adjustment brush functionality along with the gradient filter effects.

Photographing Oxford

Photographing Oxford

iso 200 , 50mm, f/2.2, 1/1000 sec

This shot is interesting because of it’s extreme shallow depth of field (focus).  By keeping the aperture very wide at f/2.2, I was able to keep my friend Cristian sharp, while blurring out Radcliffe Camera (the round building) in the background.  Unfortunately, many inexpensive lenses do not allow you to get very wide apertures, but the lens I was using is a real cheap one, the Canon 50mm f1.8 II which retails for only $100.  I highly recommend this lens even if it’s very chintzy looking.

Through The Trees

50mm| 1/800 | f/2.8 | ISO 200


This shot was taken at Union Square. I removed most of the colors but left the oranges, and yellows. I think it looks interesting like that. This shot was completely post-processed within Lightroom. I try to avoid Photoshop when I can.

Car Wash

1/800s . f/5.6 . ISO 200 . 250 mm

Here’s one I really like. I took this shot in Queens. This shot is at 400mm in 35mm equivalent terms. By using the long-end of my telephoto lens, I was able to get a telephoto compression effect where the signs are all squeezed together.

Sunset between 2 buildings

1/200s . f/10.0 . ISO 200 . 35 mm

I highly recommend taking the sunset harbor cruise by Circle Line.  You can get some beautiful shots like this one.  I spent a good amount of time in Lightroom recovering some of the lost detail in the original image.  With a jpeg file this would have been image would be a no-go, but the raw file saved the day.  This is where having an advanced camera will truly come in handy.

Statue of Liberty Funkified

Here’s one I love, another crazy view of the Statue of Liberty.  This time with crazy colors.  Believe it or not I accomplished 99% using Lightroom, and merely cleaned up the excess digital noise in Photoshop.  I love Lightroom.

Brooklyn Bridge Photography

Photographing the Brooklyn Bridge

One of my favorite shots, taken on a Circle Line Sunset Harbor Cruise.  I like the way it isn’t just a bridge, but also has the tourists in the foreground.  The guy in the hood has a better camera than I but oh well.

Back of Liberty

Back of Liberty

Here is one of my favorite black and whites, because nobody ever takes a picture of the BACK.  I mean we could go our whole lives without knowing what the back of the Statue of Liberty looks like.  Luckily, now you won’t have this issue.

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